History Still Lives Beneath the Waters of the Great Lakes


Recently, a shipwreck was discovered in Lake Erie 184 years after it sank. This ship's name was the Lake Serpent.

The Lake Serpent left Cleveland, in September 1829 for a 55 mile trip to the Lake Erie Islands. It never returned. The National Museum of the Great Lakes has claimed that they’ve learned enough information to determine that the shipwreck was the Lake Serpent. They also discovered that the ship carried stone from Kelly’s Islands. When found, it turned out to be the oldest known shipwreck in Lake Erie.

The National Museum of the Great Lakes is searching for ships at the bottom of the lakes and studying them. A man named Chris Gilcrest started the museum in 1999. Carrie Sowden, an archaeological director who works at the museum, said, “There’s a lot of missing history under the lakes.”

The Great Lakes are very important in the United States history, especially the control of the lakes during the War of 1812. Cities like Detroit, Chicago, Buffalo, and Milwaukee developed around the lakes. The lakes are an inexpensive way to ship cargo. A problem with shipping cargo on the lakes is that many vessels go through severe and unpredictable weather, usually resulting in the sinking. Some ships still remain at the bottom of the lake.

Finding these ships help explain parts of our history. It’s also an interesting part in the Great Lakes. Other ships are still being found, like the ship Margaret Owill this year.

[Source: Smithsonian.com]

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