How Wisconsin Benefited
from Prisoners of War

by Devika Pal, age 13

In 1942, a rumor spread around England that Hitler was planning to initiate an airdrop of weapons into the prison camps to bring back Nazi prisoners of war (POWs). Hearing the rumors, England became worried and asked America to house their prisoners. America reluctantly agreed and the Germans, Japanese and Koreans POWs were sent to work in America on empty supply ships known as Liberty Ships.

POWs were first sent to work in military camps, but then the Army realized that prisoners could pay for their keep if they worked in rural areas that lacked manpower. Japanese and Koreans were put in permanent base camps, while the Germans were put in branch camps, camps that were only used if needed and tended to be more lenient. The security varied with the type of camp, some letting prisoners interact with civilians while others kept them segregated. [read more]

“The Titanic of the Great Lakes”

by Alan Cruz, age 14

The S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald was one of the largest ships to ever roam North America's Great Lakes. It is also one of the most famous, and is widely known for its mysterious disappearance. The Fitzgerald is the largest ship to sink on Lake Superior.

November is one of the most dangerous months to sail on the Great Lakes. Frequent storms and strong winds can cause the huge lake to turn deadly. One of these deadly storms caught up to the Edmund Fitzgerald on November 10, 1975. [read more]

For Years, the Menominee Have Practiced Sustainable Forestry

by Virginia Quach, age 16

The Menominee people are some of Wisconsin’s oldest residents and have practiced sustained-yield forestry on their lands for hundreds of years. However, due to laws and treaties set by the United States, the Menominee have had to fight to regain control of their forests.

The Menominee once held 9.5 million acres of land, reaching from northern Wisconsin to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Through a series of treaties, the federal government drastically reduced the territory to 235,000 acres including only part of northeastern Wisconsin. In addition, the Treaty of 1854 established the Menominee Reservation, the home of the Menominee Nation now known for its sustain-yield forestry practices. Today, 220,000 of the 235,000 acres are used for forestry. [read more]

Escape Artist Harry Houdini
Died a Mysterious Death

by Julia Jones, age 10

When one thinks of a magician, one might imagine card tricks or a guy pulling a rabbit out of a hat. The famous Harry Houdini did more than that, however: he was an escape artist.

Houdini was born March 24, 1874, in Budapest, Hungry. Born with the name ''Enrich Weisz,'' he was one of seven children. His parents, Cecilia Steiner and Rabbi Mayer Weisz, decided to move their family to America in 1876. They first moved to Appleton, Wisconsin. [read more]




About 11,000 years ago, a man died in what is now Nevada. The body was placed in a blanket and buried at a place called Spirit Cave. Recent research and scientific discoveries, including new research at Spirit Cave, are changing what we know about prehistory. [read more...]
The S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald was one of the largest ships to ever roam North America's Great Lakes. It is also one of the most famous, and is widely known for its mysterious disappearance. The Fitzgerald is the largest ship to sink on Lake Superior. [read more...]
In 1942, a rumor spread around England that Hitler was planning to initiate an airdrop of weapons into the prison camps to bring back Nazi prisoners of war (POWs). Hearing the rumors, England became worried and asked America to house their prisoners. America reluctantly agreed and the Germans, Japanese and Koreans POWs were sent to work in America on empty supply ships known as Liberty Ships. [read more...]
The Midwest harbors many fascinating many mounds, burial sites, and historical landmarks - some are even located in Wisconsin. [read more...]
When one thinks of a magician, one might imagine card tricks or a guy pulling a rabbit out of a hat. The famous Harry Houdini did more than that, however: he was an escape artist. [read more...]
The Menominee people are some of Wisconsin’s oldest residents and have practiced sustained-yield forestry on their lands for hundreds of years. However, due to laws and treaties set by the United States, the Menominee have had to fight to regain control of their forests. [read more...]
The Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council is suggesting several new requirements that the group says will strengthen Wisconsin’s open government rules, allow government bodies to operate with more transparency, and provide the public with better access to important information. [read more...]