Yahara Lakes Inspired Native American Mound Builders

by Robert Tecpoyotl, age 13

Imagine having to campaign to keep commercial businesses from building over the cemetery your grandmother is buried in. This is a struggle that many Native Americans face today. Every day, they see their culture and what their ancestors built being taken away and destroyed.

Effigy mounds are locations of burial grounds that usually have animal shapes. Some of them were used for human burial and contained personal belongings of the deceased; others were used for ceremonial purposes. Effigy mounds are unique to Wisconsin’s history. They show us the history and culture of Wisconsin before European settlers arrived. [read more]

Wisconsin's Complex History Involving the Civil War

by Desteny Alvarez, age 14

What does Wisconsin have to do with the Civil War? It turns out, quite a bit.

The Civil War started because the southern states, called the Confederacy, hoped to form their own country with their own laws. Specifically, they wanted to continue using slaves. The northern states, called the Union, wanted to keep all the states together and abolish slavery, a principle backed by President Lincoln. On April 12, 1861, the Confederate army attacked the Union army. This started the Civil War. [read more]

The Oneota Were One of the First Settlers in Wisconsin

by Eowyn Gomez Cruz, age 14

After the Mississippians settled in Wisconsin, other groups of Indians began living in Wisconsin. Between 1000 AD and 1630 AD, a group of Indians that the archaeologists called Oneota lived along the Waupaca River. They were the ancestors of the Ho-Chunk and other Indian nations.

The Oneota settled in large villages in southern Wisconsin. They often lived near large bodies of water, such as the Mississippi River and Lake Michigan, but also lived next to smaller rivers. The Dombrowski Site is one of several small Oneota villages found along the Waupaca River in Portage County in the Central Plain. They were excellent farmers: cultivating corn, beans, and squash. The three vegetables were named the “three sisters” by many Native Americans. The “three sisters” grew well together and made for a well-balanced diet. [read more]

How Wisconsin Benefited from Prisoners of War

by Devika Pal, age 13

In 1942, a rumor spread around England that Hitler was planning to initiate an airdrop of weapons into the prison camps to bring back Nazi prisoners of war (POWs). Hearing the rumors, England became worried and asked America to house their prisoners. America reluctantly agreed and the Germans, Japanese and Koreans POWs were sent to work in America on empty supply ships known as Liberty Ships.

POWs were first sent to work in military camps, but then the Army realized that prisoners could pay for their keep if they worked in rural areas that lacked manpower. Japanese and Koreans were put in permanent base camps, while the Germans were put in branch camps, camps that were only used if needed and tended to be more lenient. The security varied with the type of camp, some letting prisoners interact with civilians while others kept them segregated. [read more]




About 11,000 years ago, a man died in what is now Nevada. The body was placed in a blanket and buried at a place called Spirit Cave. Recent research and scientific discoveries, including new research at Spirit Cave, are changing what we know about prehistory. [read more...]
After the Mississippians settled in Wisconsin, other groups of Indians began living in Wisconsin. Between 1000 AD and 1630 AD, a group of Indians that the archaeologists called Oneota lived along the Waupaca River. They were the ancestors of the Ho-Chunk and other Indian nations. [read more...]
What does Wisconsin have to do with the Civil War? It turns out, quite a bit. [read more...]
Have you ever been hiking in the Madison area and seen mounds in the ground? Do you know the significance of a mound to Wisconsin’s history? [read more...]
Imagine having to campaign to keep commercial businesses from building over the cemetery your grandmother is buried in. This is a struggle that many Native Americans face today. Every day, they see their culture and what their ancestors built being taken away and destroyed. [read more...]
The S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald was one of the largest ships to ever roam North America's Great Lakes. It is also one of the most famous, and is widely known for its mysterious disappearance. The Fitzgerald is the largest ship to sink on Lake Superior. [read more...]
In 1942, a rumor spread around England that Hitler was planning to initiate an airdrop of weapons into the prison camps to bring back Nazi prisoners of war (POWs). Hearing the rumors, England became worried and asked America to house their prisoners. America reluctantly agreed and the Germans, Japanese and Koreans POWs were sent to work in America on empty supply ships known as Liberty Ships. [read more...]
The Midwest harbors many fascinating many mounds, burial sites, and historical landmarks - some are even located in Wisconsin. [read more...]
When one thinks of a magician, one might imagine card tricks or a guy pulling a rabbit out of a hat. The famous Harry Houdini did more than that, however: he was an escape artist. [read more...]
The Menominee people are some of Wisconsin’s oldest residents and have practiced sustained-yield forestry on their lands for hundreds of years. However, due to laws and treaties set by the United States, the Menominee have had to fight to regain control of their forests. [read more...]
The Wisconsin Freedom of Information Council is suggesting several new requirements that the group says will strengthen Wisconsin’s open government rules, allow government bodies to operate with more transparency, and provide the public with better access to important information. [read more...]