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Barrier Islands Form Under Specific Conditions

by Destany Jackson, age 13

Coastal sand crumbles at the human touch but is powerful enough to form barrier islands. Have you ever wondered how this is possible?

A barrier island is a long, narrow island that lies parallel and close to a mainland to protect the mainland from erosion and storms. Barrier islands only form from coastal sands under three conditions. First, there needs to be enough sand to form an island—though they also often include rock parties supplied by erosion of nearby land. Second, winds and waves have to have enough energy to shift the sand. These winds and waves pick up and deposit sand on long coastlines. [Read More]

The Great Sphinx Guards the Pyramids of Giza


Ancient Egyptians were skilled mathematicians and architects who built huge stone monuments in honor of their rulers. One type of monument they built for their pharaohs was the pyramid. The most impressive of the ancient monuments were the Egyptian pyramids which were built in Giza.

The Pyramids were built for the pharaohs of the Old Kingdom who ruled from 2686 to 2134 BC. The tombs inside the pyramids were huge and had four walls. The first Egyptian pyramid had stepped sides and was built in Saqqara around 2650 B.C.E. The pyramids built over 100 years later, in Giza, had flat sides. Inside the pyramids were burial chambers and secret passageways. No one really knows why the tombs were built in a pyramid shape. One theory is that the sides were viewed as a stairway to heaven to help pharaohs achieve eternal life. [Read More]

 

Something for Everyone at Lake Farm Park and Capital Springs Recreation


On a chilly and cloudy morning, we took a trip to Lake Farm County Park, a section of the Capital Springs Recreation Area, to take a tour of the property and the new Lower Yahara River Trail. The Lower River Trail includes a new boardwalk bridge that stretches over Lake Waubesa, connecting Madison to McFarland. The total distance of the trail is 2.5 miles, and the bridge itself is an impressive mile long. The boardwalk bridge is fully accessible and features fishing piers and scenic outlooks. At the end of the bridge, the tranquility of McDaniel Park awaited us.

We walked back across the bridge to Lake Farm County Park. We soon realized there were many connecting trails for those who enjoy activities such as hiking and cross-country skiing. [Read More]

 

More Recent Geography Articles


Coastal sand crumbles at the human touch but is powerful enough to form barrier islands. Have you ever wondered how this is possible? [read more...]
Ancient Egyptians were skilled mathematicians and architects who built huge stone monuments in honor of their rulers. One type of monument they built for their pharaohs was the pyramid. The most impressive of the ancient monuments were the Egyptian pyramids which were built in Giza. [read more...]
On a chilly and cloudy morning, we took a trip to Lake Farm County Park, a section of the Capital Springs Recreation Area, to take a tour of the property and the new Lower Yahara River Trail. The Lower River Trail includes a new boardwalk bridge that stretches over Lake Waubesa, connecting Madison to McFarland. The total distance of the trail is 2.5 miles, and the bridge itself is an impressive mile long. The boardwalk bridge is fully accessible and features fishing piers and scenic outlooks. At the end of the bridge, the tranquility of McDaniel Park awaited us. [read more...]
For years, scientists have recorded volcanic eruptions. One such explosion, the biggest in recorded history, is known as “The Big Bang at Krakatoa.” [read more...]
From 1789 to 1799, the people of France led their country in a revolution that marked a huge turning point in European history and led to the end of the French Monarchy. The period included the Reign of Terror which lasted for from 1793 to 1794. [read more...]
In Ancient Egypt, around 2686 to 2181 B.C.E., the Egyptians built the Pyramids of Giza. These pyramids held the tombs of pharaohs and many secrets for thousands of years. Now that the chambers of the deceased pharaohs are opened, a number of ancient Egyptian secrets have been revealed. [read more...]
Death Valley is a desert located between California and Nevada. It is the hottest place on planet Earth, the highest temperatures in Death Valley can reach up to 134 degrees Fahrenheit. [read more...]
The forests of Madagascar, an island located off the east coast of Africa, are host to many unique plants and animals. Madagascar was first discovered by humans approximately two thousand years ago. Now, less than ten percent of the lush forest remains – the sole habitat of many indigenous animals. [read more...]
Many may have heard the name “Malala Yousafzai” before, but some might not know who this powerful young woman is. Yousafzai is a very important activist who has helped girls in Pakistan fight for their educations. [read more...]
With wind whipping through the sails of her ship, Laura Dekker set off on a once-in-a-lifetime adventure. She had a dream of sailing around the world, and she wanted badly to accomplish it. At the age of 14, Dekker set out to achieve her dream and began to sail around the world by herself. [read more...]
Grown in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America, the sisal plant is truly amazing. It has had a major impact on the economy of Tanzania, where thousands are employed to produce sisal. [read more...]
You probably know the legend of the majestic, antlered deer that live in the North Pole. You may even know that reindeer exist outside of Christmas stories. But did you know that there are actually people who live among reindeer? [read more...]
California’s Yosemite National Park is a very large and beautiful place. Home to thousands of animal and plant species, the park boasts awesome mountains, scenic valleys, and clear rivers. [read more...]
One of the most fearsome leaders of the early 5th century was not a war general or a dictator. No, he was the short, illegitimate son of an Irish king. His story is often overlooked in history books and little is known about his personal life, but his legacy lives on along with his name: he is Niall of the Nine Hostages. [read more...]
Back in the 1800s, many Irish people emigrated to Wisconsin. To this day, their descendants continue to live throughout the state and influence its culture. [read more...]
The Galapagos are a group of oceanic islands made up of 15 main islands, 42 islets, and 26 rocks and reefs. Located in the Pacific Ocean, the islands were created when lava rose from the sea bed. The region also has a marine reserve of 79,900 square kilometers. [read more...]
The Great Barrier Reef, at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, is an astounding symbol of life and beauty. Home to thousands of creatures, it is currently under threat of destruction, however, and could ultimately become a representation of how the world can kill a natural-made beauty. [read more...]
Could you imagine walking over 1600 kilometers, alone and in the cold, harsh weather of the Antarctic? This past year, a man almost completed this nearly impossible task. [read more...]
Did you know that several generations of the giant forest hog’s offspring live with their families in extended family groups just like humans do? [read more...]
Katrin Brendemuehl, age 13 and Callan Bird Bear, age 12 The gorgeous artwork crafted by Native American tribes known as beadwork can be as intricate as the wings of a dragonfly. The allure of colorful glass beads against a dark, rich fabric is enough to catch nearly anyone’s eye. This fall, the James Watrous Gallery, a gallery at the Overture Center with a focus on contemporary Wisconsin artists, features these culturally significant, powerful works. [read more...]
Organisms as different as penguins, cacti and zebras all share planet earth based on rainfall and temperature, they each occupy different habitats. The habitats that make up planet earth are oceans, wetlands, forest, grasslands, deserts, mountains, and polar habitats. [read more...]
Deep inside planet Earth, stones are being formed into priceless gemstones. Whatever crystal or stone the Earth is making, it is regarded as a gemstone if worn as jewelry. [read more...]
The Malayan tiger, or panthera tigris jacksonipanthera tigris jacksoni, is a subspecies of the Indochinese tiger. Though this subspecies is more numerous than other types of tiger, its population is dwindling. , is a subspecies of the Indochinese tiger. Though this subspecies is more numerous than other types of tiger, its population is dwindling. [read more...]
For hundreds of years during the age of exploration, western scientists heard stories about giant dragons living on jungle islands in southeast Asia. Sailors and explorers from Europe and America didn't believe the tales. Today, however, scientists know that the seemingly ridiculous myths are actually true. [read more...]
>Every year, scientists discover close to 20,000 new species of animals, most of which are insects. The discovery of a mammal is much rarer. For that reason, scientists were recently surprised to find a new species of mole rat in Africa. [read more...]